Hex Omega
I’m Lydia, I’m 22 years old from the UK and I just finished studying for a degree in Fine Art.

find my work at www.lydbrock.tumblr.com

this is my scrapbook
click tags to see what I post
have a nice time
Hex Omega
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floresenelatico:

 Josh Keyes
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wolftea:

Peeking down the nasal cavity of a deer
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heptagram:

Sarah Martinet
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fyeahwomenartists:

Christina Schou ChristensenShaping Fluid
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firmamente:

. by Steve Skafte
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cinoh:

Kohlrabi
cinoh:

Kohlrabi
cinoh:

Kohlrabi
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fernfiddlehead:

handwoven wallhanging no. 062614 / tapestry weaving by ohalbatross (185.00 USD) http://ift.tt/1yL5InO
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darksilenceinsuburbia:

Morgane Tschiember
View of the exhibition “Seuils”, Fondation d’entreprise Ricard, Paris , 2012
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Morgane Tschiember
View of the exhibition “Seuils”, Fondation d’entreprise Ricard, Paris , 2012
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Morgane Tschiember
View of the exhibition “Seuils”, Fondation d’entreprise Ricard, Paris , 2012
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hawktrainer:

New basket from by exhibition Brooklyn Nets. Cotton cord and sewing thread.
hawktrainer:

New basket from by exhibition Brooklyn Nets. Cotton cord and sewing thread.
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splendiferoushoney:

by pawelmatys
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followthewestwind:

(via 500px / English Ivy by Carrie Cole)
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cinoh:

the-drawing-center:  It’s time for another Throwback Thursday! In 2004, Ocean Flowers: Impressions from Nature was a groundbreaking exhibition, curated by Catherine de Zegher and Carol Armstrong, tracing the role of drawing and botany in the development of early photography in the mid-nineteenth century.
Focusing on a period of tremendous advances in graphic media, the exhibition featured over 300 beautiful natural-history illustrations from the Victorian era. Ocean Flowers highlighted the fertile exchange between drawings, “nature prints” (direct imprints from plants), hand-colored prints, mounted specimens, and “photogenic drawings” (photographs made without a camera).
The Ocean Flowers catalogue is now out of print and out of stock, but the book can be viewed for a limited time in The Drawing Center’s Scriptorium. The Scriptorium will only be open for two more weekends, August 16-17 and August 23-24, so be sure to take advantage of this special opportunity!
Images:
Anna Atkins, Papaver rhoeas, from Cyanotypes of British and Foreign Flowering Plants and Ferns, 1851-1854. Cyanotype, 34.9 x 24.8 cm. Hans P. Kraus, Jr., New York.
Mary Wyatt, Iridaea edulis, from Algae Danmonienses: or dried specimens of Marine Plants, principally collected in Devonshire, Vol. 2, 1834-1840. Natural specimen, 29 x 23.5 cm. The Natural History Museum, London.
Anonymous, Polypodium, date unknown. Watercolor on paper, 47.5 x 35.5 cm. Collection of John Forbes Royle, William Carey, and others. Royal Botanical Gardens, Kew.
cinoh:

the-drawing-center:  It’s time for another Throwback Thursday! In 2004, Ocean Flowers: Impressions from Nature was a groundbreaking exhibition, curated by Catherine de Zegher and Carol Armstrong, tracing the role of drawing and botany in the development of early photography in the mid-nineteenth century.
Focusing on a period of tremendous advances in graphic media, the exhibition featured over 300 beautiful natural-history illustrations from the Victorian era. Ocean Flowers highlighted the fertile exchange between drawings, “nature prints” (direct imprints from plants), hand-colored prints, mounted specimens, and “photogenic drawings” (photographs made without a camera).
The Ocean Flowers catalogue is now out of print and out of stock, but the book can be viewed for a limited time in The Drawing Center’s Scriptorium. The Scriptorium will only be open for two more weekends, August 16-17 and August 23-24, so be sure to take advantage of this special opportunity!
Images:
Anna Atkins, Papaver rhoeas, from Cyanotypes of British and Foreign Flowering Plants and Ferns, 1851-1854. Cyanotype, 34.9 x 24.8 cm. Hans P. Kraus, Jr., New York.
Mary Wyatt, Iridaea edulis, from Algae Danmonienses: or dried specimens of Marine Plants, principally collected in Devonshire, Vol. 2, 1834-1840. Natural specimen, 29 x 23.5 cm. The Natural History Museum, London.
Anonymous, Polypodium, date unknown. Watercolor on paper, 47.5 x 35.5 cm. Collection of John Forbes Royle, William Carey, and others. Royal Botanical Gardens, Kew.
cinoh:

the-drawing-center:  It’s time for another Throwback Thursday! In 2004, Ocean Flowers: Impressions from Nature was a groundbreaking exhibition, curated by Catherine de Zegher and Carol Armstrong, tracing the role of drawing and botany in the development of early photography in the mid-nineteenth century.
Focusing on a period of tremendous advances in graphic media, the exhibition featured over 300 beautiful natural-history illustrations from the Victorian era. Ocean Flowers highlighted the fertile exchange between drawings, “nature prints” (direct imprints from plants), hand-colored prints, mounted specimens, and “photogenic drawings” (photographs made without a camera).
The Ocean Flowers catalogue is now out of print and out of stock, but the book can be viewed for a limited time in The Drawing Center’s Scriptorium. The Scriptorium will only be open for two more weekends, August 16-17 and August 23-24, so be sure to take advantage of this special opportunity!
Images:
Anna Atkins, Papaver rhoeas, from Cyanotypes of British and Foreign Flowering Plants and Ferns, 1851-1854. Cyanotype, 34.9 x 24.8 cm. Hans P. Kraus, Jr., New York.
Mary Wyatt, Iridaea edulis, from Algae Danmonienses: or dried specimens of Marine Plants, principally collected in Devonshire, Vol. 2, 1834-1840. Natural specimen, 29 x 23.5 cm. The Natural History Museum, London.
Anonymous, Polypodium, date unknown. Watercolor on paper, 47.5 x 35.5 cm. Collection of John Forbes Royle, William Carey, and others. Royal Botanical Gardens, Kew.
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